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Heraclitus

Utrecht Moreelse Heraclite.JPG Heraclitus by Johannes Moreelse. The image depicts him as "the weeping philosopher" wringing his hands over the world, and as "the obscure" dressed in dark clothing—both traditional motifs
Born 535 BC
Ephesus, Ionia, Persian Empire
Diedc. 475 BC (age c. 60)
EraAncient philosophy
RegionWestern philosophy
SchoolIonian
Main interestsMetaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, cosmology
Notable ideasLogos, "everything flows", fire is the arche, idios kosmos, Unity of opposites

The becoming ontology

According to tradition,[2] Heraclitus wrote a treatise about nature named "Περὶ φύσεως" ("Perì phýseōs"), "About Nature," in which appears the famous aphorism πάντα ῥεῖ ("panta rhei [os potamòs]") translated literally as "the whole flows [as a river]," or figuratively as "everything flows, nothing stands still." The concept of "becoming" in philosophy is connected with two others: movement and evolution, as becoming assumes a "changing to" and a "moving toward." Becoming is the process or state of change and coming about in time and space.

Panta rhei, "everything flows"edit]

Heraclitus by Hendrick ter Brugghen

The phrase πάντα ῥεῖ (panta rhei) "everything flows"[36] either was spoken by Heraclitus or survived as a quotation of his. This famous aphorism used to characterize Heraclitus' thought comes from Simplicius,[37] a neoplatonist, and from Plato's Cratylus. The word rhei (as in rheology) is the Greek word for "to stream", and is etymologically related to Rhea according to Plato's Cratylus.[38]

The philosophy of Heraclitus is summed up in his cryptic utterance:[39]

ποταμοῖσι τοῖσιν αὐτοῖσιν ἐμβαίνουσιν, ἕτερα καὶ ἕτερα ὕδατα ἐπιρρεῖ.
Potamoisi toisin autoisin embainousin, hetera kai hetera hudata epirrei
"Ever-newer waters flow on those who step into the same rivers."

The quote from Heraclitus appears in Plato's Cratylus twice; in 401d as:[40]

τὰ ὄντα ἰέναι τε πάντα καὶ μένειν οὐδέν
Ta onta ienai te panta kai menein ouden
"All entities move and nothing remains still"

and in 402a[41]

"πάντα χωρεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει" καὶ "δὶς ἐς τὸν αὐτὸν ποταμὸν οὐκ ἂν ἐμβαίης"
Panta chōrei kai ouden menei kai dis es ton auton potamon ouk an embaies
"Everything changes and nothing remains still ... and ... you cannot step twice into the same stream"[42]

Panta rhei, "everything flows"

Heraclitus by Hendrick ter Brugghen

The phrase πάντα ῥεῖ (panta rhei) "everything flows"[36] either was spoken by Heraclitus or survived as a quotation of his. This famous aphorism used to characterize Heraclitus' thought comes from Simplicius,[37] a neoplatonist, and from Plato's Cratylus. The word rhei (as in rheology) is the Greek word for "to stream", and is etymologically related to Rhea according to Plato's Cratylus.[38]

The philosophy of Heraclitus is summed up in his cryptic utterance:[39]

ποταμοῖσι τοῖσιν αὐτοῖσιν ἐμβαίνουσιν, ἕτερα καὶ ἕτερα ὕδατα ἐπιρρεῖ.
Potamoisi toisin autoisin embainousin, hetera kai hetera hudata epirrei
"Ever-newer waters flow on those who step into the same rivers."

The quote from Heraclitus appears in Plato's Cratylus twice; in 401d as:[40]

τὰ ὄντα ἰέναι τε πάντα καὶ μένειν οὐδέν
Ta onta ienai te panta kai menein ouden
"All entities move and nothing remains still"

and in 402a[41]

"πάντα χωρεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει" καὶ "δὶς ἐς τὸν αὐτὸν ποταμὸν οὐκ ἂν ἐμβαίης"
Panta chōrei kai ouden menei kai dis es ton auton potamon ouk an embaies
"Everything changes and nothing remains still ... and ... you cannot step twice into the same stream"[42]

Instead of "flow" Plato uses chōrei, "to change place" (χῶρος; chōros).

The assertions of flow are coupled in many fragments with the enigmatic river image:[43]

Ποταμοῖς τοῖς αὐτοῖς ἐμβαίνομέν τε καὶ οὐκ ἐμβαίνομεν, εἶμέν τε καὶ οὐκ εἶμεν.
"We both step and do not step in the same rivers. We are and are not."

Heraclitus's Idea of Flow / Change     verse   "End of History Illusion"

"I personally see "End of History Illusion",creates the wall,the road block to evolving for most people,"They remain in Plato's Cave",they step into the River thinking it is the same river,! I see this as the primary or a root form for human beings as a whole have not evolved to any degree in 2000 years."

I hate to think this,yet I think alot of people see as Parmenides

,if he was right though,then many of us are really deluted!