MichaelEmeryArt

The Muse and Autoeroticism

Autoeroticism is the practice of becoming sexually stimulated through internal stimuli. The term was popularized toward the end of the 19th century by British sexologist Havelock Ellis, who defined autoeroticism as "the phenomena of spontaneous sexual emotion generated in the absence of an external stimulus proceeding, directly or indirectly, from another person".[1]

The most common autoerotic practice is masturbation. Though the terms autoeroticism and masturbation are often used interchangeably, they are not synonymous as not all autoerotic behaviors are masturbatory. Nocturnal emissions, erotic daydreams, and sexual arousal to 'sexually-neutral' stimuli (music, scenery, art, risk, spiritual reverie, etc.) are also examples of autoeroticism

The list of muses comprises:

  1. Calliope, the muse of epic poetry
  2. Clio, the muse of history
  3. Erato, the muse of lyric poetry
  4. Euterpe, the muse of song
  5. Melpomene, the muse of tragedy
  6. Polyhymnia, the muse of hymns
  7. Terpsichore, the muse of dance
  8. Thalia, the muse of comedy
  9. Urania, the muse of astronomy

Musing -characterized by reflection or deep thought:

The Muses (/ˈmjuːzɪz/; Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, Moũsai) are the inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts in Greek mythology. They were considered the source of the knowledge embodied in the poetry, lyric songs, and myths that were related orally for centuries in these ancient cultures. They were later adopted by the Romans as a part of their pantheon.

In current English usage, "muse" can refer in general to a person who inspires an artist, musician, or writer.[1