MichaelEmeryArt

                              Independent→ self-concept

One's self-concept (also called self-construction, self-identity, self-perspective or self-structure) is a collection of beliefs about oneself.[1][2] Generally, self-concept embodies the answer to "Who am I?".[3]

One's self-concept is made up of self-schemas, and their past, present, and future selves.

Self-concept is distinguishable from self-awareness, which refers to the extent to which self-knowledge is defined, consistent, and currently applicable to one's attitudes and dispositions.[4] Self-concept also differs from self-esteem: self-concept is a cognitive or descriptive component of one's self (e.g. "I am a fast runner"), while self-esteem is evaluative and opinionated (e.g. "I feel good about being a fast runner").

Self-concept is made up of one's self-schemas, and interacts with self-esteem, self-knowledge, and the social self to form the self as whole. It includes the past, present, and future selves, where future selves (or possible selves) represent individuals' ideas of what they might become, what they would like to become, or what they are afraid of becoming. Possible selves may function as incentives for certain behavior.[3][5]

The perception people have about their past or future selves relates to their perception of their current selves. The temporal self-appraisal theory[6] argues that people have a tendency to maintain a positive self-evaluation by distancing themselves from their negative self and paying more attention to their positive one. In addition, people have a tendency to perceive the past self less favorably[7] (e.g. "I'm better than I used to be") and the future self more positively[8] (e.g. "I will be better than I am now").


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Hidden curriculum ;

A hidden curriculum is a side effect of schooling, "[lessons] which are learned but not openly intended"[1] such as the transmission of norms, values, and beliefs conveyed in the classroom and the social environment.[2] It should be mentioned that the breaktime is an important part of the hidden curriculum.[3]


Any learning experience may teach unintended lessons.[1] Hidden curriculum often refers to knowledge gained in primary and secondary school settings, usually with a negative connotation where the school strives for equal intellectual development (as a positive aim).[4] In this sense, a hidden curriculum reinforces existing social inequalities by educating students according to their class and social status. The unequal distribution of cultural capital in a society mirrors a corresponding distribution of knowledge among its students.[5]


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Dumbing Us Down  The book proposes that radical change is needed to the American educational system to turn around the negative socialization that children receive.  John Taylor Gatto...He was named New York City Teacher of the Year in 1989, 1990, and 1991, and New York State Teacher of the Year in 1991.[3]