MichaelEmeryArt

                                    Social Competition

excerpts from ; " Competition: Meaning, Characteristics and Types of Competition + "

Characteristics:

1. Competition is a culturally patterned process:

It is present to some degree in all societies but it differs greatly from society to society. The fiercely competitive Kwakiutl society (a tribe of North America) and the relatively non-competitive Zuni (a pueblo Indian group of New Mexico) society offer an example of a striking contrast. American society though compet­itive, yet this competition is sharply limited.

2. Competition is impersonal:

Competition is impersonal and is usually not directed against any individual or group in particular. Competition may be personal when the competitors know one another but generally its nature is impersonal.

3. Competition is unconscious:

Competition takes place on the unconscious level. Competitors at many times are not aware about other competitors and even if they are aware, they do not pay any heed to the activities of their competitors. For example, candidates, appearing for IAS or any other competitive examination, do not know one another and their whole attention is focused on their studies (reward or goal) rather than on competitors.

4. Competition is universal:

Competition, though an important characteristic feature of modem society, is found in all societies—primitive, traditional, modem or in pre-historic eras and in every age.



I truly believe most of the articles, research, etc fail to realize the impotantance of " competition for social identity ", is it that so many are so un-aware of this?

Competition and hostility between groups is thus not only a matter of competing for resources (like in Sherif’s Robbers Cave) like jobs but also the result of competing identities. Conclusion Just to reiterate, in social identity theory the group membership is not something foreign or artificial which is attached onto the person,it is a real, true and vital part of the person.                " we adopt the identity of the group we have categorized ourselves as belonging to."